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THREE WEEKS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA

BLOG #38, SERIES #8

WEDNESDAYS WITH DR. JOE

THREE WEEKS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA

September 20, 2017

Canada is big—roughly the size of the United States, but in population, the U.S. is ten times more populous. Canada, this year, is celebrating its 150th year as a nation (still an integral part of the British Empire). Unprecedented numbers of Canadians are celebrating that anniversary by visiting their great provincial parks—free, during 2017.

Camp Hope is nestled in the mountains

Interestingly enough, I’ve noticed, in recent years, that the U.S. and Canada are gradually but inexorably merging their cultures, states, and provinces. When it’s hot in the U.S., U.S. citizens travel north; when it’s cold in Canada, Canadians travel south. In Florida, during a certain week in the autumn, it seems like half of Canada has arrived in the suddenly crowded streets. The same is true in California and Arizona. More and more, both nations are tending to refer to states and provinces interchangeably.

Canadians often feel suffocated by the omnipresent U.S. media, impossible to avoid since the vast majority of Canadians live so close to the U.S. border. And they are bombarded by U.S. media 24/7. In fact, that constant electronic blitz makes it increasingly difficult for Canadians to maintain their cultural uniqueness. Intermarriage blurs that as well: our daughter Michelle married Duane Culmore of Oshawa, Ontario, thus resulting in our two grandsons, Taylor and Seth, being dual citizens of both nations.

Thus when I was recently invited to direct two camp meeting seminars in Hope, British Columbia, we welcomed the opportunity to learn more about that great nation to our north.

AN OLD-FASHIONED CAMP MEETING

In America, camp meetings have been part of our culture for centuries. In fact, most Protestant churches have a long rich tradition of holding them. Even the generally secular Chautauqua gatherings were little different from the Christian camp meetings structure-wise.

The Lodge at Camp Hope

For a while it appeared that camp meetings would be snuffed out by our secular culture, however, it’s amazing to see how many churches stubbornly refuse to give them up. It is my personal belief that the American pendulum (both the U.S. and Canada are alike Americans) has ideologically swung so far to the left that it has reached the point where there almost has to be a course correction. Especially is this true in the more conservative heartland outside the mega-cities. I submit that the continued existence of camp meetings is part of this cultural phenomenon.

Next week, I’ll tell you what it’s like to attend a camp meeting in this new millenium.

 

 

One thought on “THREE WEEKS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA

  1. It is just too bad that Canda and the U.S. do not merge and consolidate their assets.

    Campmeetings use to be a big thing in most States. However, over the last twenty years interest has declined, especially among the very well educated. The ten day campmeeting is becoming a thing of the past because of a lack of attendance during the week. This is a result of most women working outside the home. Also, a more educated class do not feel that campmeeting meets their needs. Extremists love to attend campmeeting, peddling their philosophies. Legalism is prevalent, and most of the speakers are pastors, rather than other qualified laymen. It is for these reasons that I have stopped attending campmeeting. There is too much emphasis on behaviorial issues. Thank you fore this post.

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